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Bacon, which cost $1.25 per pound in 1860, sold for $10, while the price of sugar increased more than fifteen-fold and coffee cost forty times what it had previously... No salt meant no meat during the long months following traditional slaughtering periods (late fall).Rapidly escalating prices encouraged hoarding and speculation, which drove prices up even more. Bartering transactions are excluded from historic pricing data sets because there were no records published in the newspaper, captured by commercial markets, or reported by the government.Food units are generally for large quantities, not comparable to modern supermarket prices. [SOURCE: Prices in Colonial Pennyslvania, Anne Bezanson, et al, University of Pennsylvania Press, 1935.] [1786-1817] Median annual prices for 14 leading commodities, Western Prices Before 1861/Thomas Senior Berry [Harvard University Press: Boston] 1943 [NOTE: This book offers dozens of price charts, including seasonal variations of Cincinnati Wholesale Commodity Prices 1824-1860 (p. [1832] Meat prices, Boston MA [1849] Retail food costs, California gold miners [1861-1865] American Civil War food prices [1860-2009] The Value of A Dollar: Prices and Incomes in the United States, selected food prices extracted from advertisements and federal data [NOTE: Value of a Dollar books are available in most public libraries. Urban taverns offered a wider range of services, including both public and private dining facilties. Pricing notes here: "The fare in a rural tavern..simple, whatever the tavern keeper had on hand for his/her own family and was willing to share...[18th century] Early American Tavern menu prices [1720-1775] Average wholesale prices of selected commodities in Philadelphia (bread, ship's bread, corn, rice, pork, flour, beef, salt, sugar, molasses, wine, & rum. 568-567).] [19th century] American pioneer provision prices [1817-1930] Family food expenditures [1817, 1833, 1851, 1864, 1926, 1930], The American and His Food/ Richard Osborn Cummings. In the back of this book you will find charts for selected items listing both historic prices and prices expressed in 2007 dollars.] [1874-1970] How much did Americans spend on food? These establishments offered meals to the general public. The prices charged for food (and nearly everything else) in a licensed tavern were regulated by law.Rice for Fraunces Tavern Museum [Regnery Gateway: Chicago] 1983 (p.85-93) Sample New Jersey prices: [1772: Mercer Country] "Princeton, 30th September 1772, 60 Dinners @2 s(hillings) each" ---"History of the Nassau Inn at Princeton," Prof. Lansing Collins, Proceedings of the New Jersey Historical Society, New Series, January 1930, Volume XV, No. 52) [1784: Burlington County NJ] Breakfast, 1 shilling; breakfast extraordinary, 1 shilling 3 pence; Dinner, 1 shilling 3 pence; Dinner extraordinary, 2 shillings; Supper, 1 shilling; Supper extraordinary, 2 shillings." ---Old Inns and Taverns in West Jersey, Camden County Historical Society, 1962) [1801: Middlesex County] In May, 1801 [Vernon Tavern, New Brunswick NJ] prices were fixed by Council were for a good breakfast 40 cents, a good dinner 50 cents, a good supper 40 cents, lodging 12 cents, making $1.42 per day; while a common breakfast, dinner, and supper cost each 10 cents less or $1.12 per day, for the less particular customers.it would be interesting to know just in what the bill of fare differed.'" ---"Early Taverns in New Brunswick," Wm. Benedict, Proceedings of the New Jersey Historical Society, New Series 1918, Volume III, No. 137) [1806: Salem County] Best dinner with pint of good beer or cider 37.5 cents Best breakfast, of tea, coffee or chocolate, loaf sugar 31 cents Ditto of cold meat with a pint of good beer or cider 25cents ---Old Inns and Taverns in West Jersey Alternative payment plans? "In the course of examining the [Elizabethtown NJ] tavern ledger we find some unusual mediums of exchange accepted in lieu of money.

||

Bacon, which cost $1.25 per pound in 1860, sold for $10, while the price of sugar increased more than fifteen-fold and coffee cost forty times what it had previously... No salt meant no meat during the long months following traditional slaughtering periods (late fall).

Rapidly escalating prices encouraged hoarding and speculation, which drove prices up even more. Bartering transactions are excluded from historic pricing data sets because there were no records published in the newspaper, captured by commercial markets, or reported by the government.

Food units are generally for large quantities, not comparable to modern supermarket prices. [SOURCE: Prices in Colonial Pennyslvania, Anne Bezanson, et al, University of Pennsylvania Press, 1935.] [1786-1817] Median annual prices for 14 leading commodities, Western Prices Before 1861/Thomas Senior Berry [Harvard University Press: Boston] 1943 [NOTE: This book offers dozens of price charts, including seasonal variations of Cincinnati Wholesale Commodity Prices 1824-1860 (p. [1832] Meat prices, Boston MA [1849] Retail food costs, California gold miners [1861-1865] American Civil War food prices [1860-2009] The Value of A Dollar: Prices and Incomes in the United States, selected food prices extracted from advertisements and federal data [NOTE: Value of a Dollar books are available in most public libraries. Urban taverns offered a wider range of services, including both public and private dining facilties. Pricing notes here: "The fare in a rural tavern..simple, whatever the tavern keeper had on hand for his/her own family and was willing to share...

[18th century] Early American Tavern menu prices [1720-1775] Average wholesale prices of selected commodities in Philadelphia (bread, ship's bread, corn, rice, pork, flour, beef, salt, sugar, molasses, wine, & rum. 568-567).] [19th century] American pioneer provision prices [1817-1930] Family food expenditures [1817, 1833, 1851, 1864, 1926, 1930], The American and His Food/ Richard Osborn Cummings. In the back of this book you will find charts for selected items listing both historic prices and prices expressed in 2007 dollars.] [1874-1970] How much did Americans spend on food? These establishments offered meals to the general public. The prices charged for food (and nearly everything else) in a licensed tavern were regulated by law.

.25 per pound in 1860, sold for , while the price of sugar increased more than fifteen-fold and coffee cost forty times what it had previously... No salt meant no meat during the long months following traditional slaughtering periods (late fall).Rapidly escalating prices encouraged hoarding and speculation, which drove prices up even more. Bartering transactions are excluded from historic pricing data sets because there were no records published in the newspaper, captured by commercial markets, or reported by the government.Food units are generally for large quantities, not comparable to modern supermarket prices. [SOURCE: Prices in Colonial Pennyslvania, Anne Bezanson, et al, University of Pennsylvania Press, 1935.] [1786-1817] Median annual prices for 14 leading commodities, Western Prices Before 1861/Thomas Senior Berry [Harvard University Press: Boston] 1943 [NOTE: This book offers dozens of price charts, including seasonal variations of Cincinnati Wholesale Commodity Prices 1824-1860 (p. [1832] Meat prices, Boston MA [1849] Retail food costs, California gold miners [1861-1865] American Civil War food prices [1860-2009] The Value of A Dollar: Prices and Incomes in the United States, selected food prices extracted from advertisements and federal data [NOTE: Value of a Dollar books are available in most public libraries. Urban taverns offered a wider range of services, including both public and private dining facilties. Pricing notes here: "The fare in a rural tavern..simple, whatever the tavern keeper had on hand for his/her own family and was willing to share...[18th century] Early American Tavern menu prices [1720-1775] Average wholesale prices of selected commodities in Philadelphia (bread, ship's bread, corn, rice, pork, flour, beef, salt, sugar, molasses, wine, & rum. 568-567).] [19th century] American pioneer provision prices [1817-1930] Family food expenditures [1817, 1833, 1851, 1864, 1926, 1930], The American and His Food/ Richard Osborn Cummings. In the back of this book you will find charts for selected items listing both historic prices and prices expressed in 2007 dollars.] [1874-1970] How much did Americans spend on food? These establishments offered meals to the general public. The prices charged for food (and nearly everything else) in a licensed tavern were regulated by law.Rice for Fraunces Tavern Museum [Regnery Gateway: Chicago] 1983 (p.85-93) Sample New Jersey prices: [1772: Mercer Country] "Princeton, 30th September 1772, 60 Dinners @2 s(hillings) each" ---"History of the Nassau Inn at Princeton," Prof. Lansing Collins, Proceedings of the New Jersey Historical Society, New Series, January 1930, Volume XV, No. 52) [1784: Burlington County NJ] Breakfast, 1 shilling; breakfast extraordinary, 1 shilling 3 pence; Dinner, 1 shilling 3 pence; Dinner extraordinary, 2 shillings; Supper, 1 shilling; Supper extraordinary, 2 shillings." ---Old Inns and Taverns in West Jersey, Camden County Historical Society, 1962) [1801: Middlesex County] In May, 1801 [Vernon Tavern, New Brunswick NJ] prices were fixed by Council were for a good breakfast 40 cents, a good dinner 50 cents, a good supper 40 cents, lodging 12 cents, making

Bacon, which cost $1.25 per pound in 1860, sold for $10, while the price of sugar increased more than fifteen-fold and coffee cost forty times what it had previously... No salt meant no meat during the long months following traditional slaughtering periods (late fall).Rapidly escalating prices encouraged hoarding and speculation, which drove prices up even more. Bartering transactions are excluded from historic pricing data sets because there were no records published in the newspaper, captured by commercial markets, or reported by the government.Food units are generally for large quantities, not comparable to modern supermarket prices. [SOURCE: Prices in Colonial Pennyslvania, Anne Bezanson, et al, University of Pennsylvania Press, 1935.] [1786-1817] Median annual prices for 14 leading commodities, Western Prices Before 1861/Thomas Senior Berry [Harvard University Press: Boston] 1943 [NOTE: This book offers dozens of price charts, including seasonal variations of Cincinnati Wholesale Commodity Prices 1824-1860 (p. [1832] Meat prices, Boston MA [1849] Retail food costs, California gold miners [1861-1865] American Civil War food prices [1860-2009] The Value of A Dollar: Prices and Incomes in the United States, selected food prices extracted from advertisements and federal data [NOTE: Value of a Dollar books are available in most public libraries. Urban taverns offered a wider range of services, including both public and private dining facilties. Pricing notes here: "The fare in a rural tavern..simple, whatever the tavern keeper had on hand for his/her own family and was willing to share...[18th century] Early American Tavern menu prices [1720-1775] Average wholesale prices of selected commodities in Philadelphia (bread, ship's bread, corn, rice, pork, flour, beef, salt, sugar, molasses, wine, & rum. 568-567).] [19th century] American pioneer provision prices [1817-1930] Family food expenditures [1817, 1833, 1851, 1864, 1926, 1930], The American and His Food/ Richard Osborn Cummings. In the back of this book you will find charts for selected items listing both historic prices and prices expressed in 2007 dollars.] [1874-1970] How much did Americans spend on food? These establishments offered meals to the general public. The prices charged for food (and nearly everything else) in a licensed tavern were regulated by law.Rice for Fraunces Tavern Museum [Regnery Gateway: Chicago] 1983 (p.85-93) Sample New Jersey prices: [1772: Mercer Country] "Princeton, 30th September 1772, 60 Dinners @2 s(hillings) each" ---"History of the Nassau Inn at Princeton," Prof. Lansing Collins, Proceedings of the New Jersey Historical Society, New Series, January 1930, Volume XV, No. 52) [1784: Burlington County NJ] Breakfast, 1 shilling; breakfast extraordinary, 1 shilling 3 pence; Dinner, 1 shilling 3 pence; Dinner extraordinary, 2 shillings; Supper, 1 shilling; Supper extraordinary, 2 shillings." ---Old Inns and Taverns in West Jersey, Camden County Historical Society, 1962) [1801: Middlesex County] In May, 1801 [Vernon Tavern, New Brunswick NJ] prices were fixed by Council were for a good breakfast 40 cents, a good dinner 50 cents, a good supper 40 cents, lodging 12 cents, making $1.42 per day; while a common breakfast, dinner, and supper cost each 10 cents less or $1.12 per day, for the less particular customers.it would be interesting to know just in what the bill of fare differed.'" ---"Early Taverns in New Brunswick," Wm. Benedict, Proceedings of the New Jersey Historical Society, New Series 1918, Volume III, No. 137) [1806: Salem County] Best dinner with pint of good beer or cider 37.5 cents Best breakfast, of tea, coffee or chocolate, loaf sugar 31 cents Ditto of cold meat with a pint of good beer or cider 25cents ---Old Inns and Taverns in West Jersey Alternative payment plans? "In the course of examining the [Elizabethtown NJ] tavern ledger we find some unusual mediums of exchange accepted in lieu of money.

||

Bacon, which cost $1.25 per pound in 1860, sold for $10, while the price of sugar increased more than fifteen-fold and coffee cost forty times what it had previously... No salt meant no meat during the long months following traditional slaughtering periods (late fall).

Rapidly escalating prices encouraged hoarding and speculation, which drove prices up even more. Bartering transactions are excluded from historic pricing data sets because there were no records published in the newspaper, captured by commercial markets, or reported by the government.

Food units are generally for large quantities, not comparable to modern supermarket prices. [SOURCE: Prices in Colonial Pennyslvania, Anne Bezanson, et al, University of Pennsylvania Press, 1935.] [1786-1817] Median annual prices for 14 leading commodities, Western Prices Before 1861/Thomas Senior Berry [Harvard University Press: Boston] 1943 [NOTE: This book offers dozens of price charts, including seasonal variations of Cincinnati Wholesale Commodity Prices 1824-1860 (p. [1832] Meat prices, Boston MA [1849] Retail food costs, California gold miners [1861-1865] American Civil War food prices [1860-2009] The Value of A Dollar: Prices and Incomes in the United States, selected food prices extracted from advertisements and federal data [NOTE: Value of a Dollar books are available in most public libraries. Urban taverns offered a wider range of services, including both public and private dining facilties. Pricing notes here: "The fare in a rural tavern..simple, whatever the tavern keeper had on hand for his/her own family and was willing to share...

[18th century] Early American Tavern menu prices [1720-1775] Average wholesale prices of selected commodities in Philadelphia (bread, ship's bread, corn, rice, pork, flour, beef, salt, sugar, molasses, wine, & rum. 568-567).] [19th century] American pioneer provision prices [1817-1930] Family food expenditures [1817, 1833, 1851, 1864, 1926, 1930], The American and His Food/ Richard Osborn Cummings. In the back of this book you will find charts for selected items listing both historic prices and prices expressed in 2007 dollars.] [1874-1970] How much did Americans spend on food? These establishments offered meals to the general public. The prices charged for food (and nearly everything else) in a licensed tavern were regulated by law.

.42 per day; while a common breakfast, dinner, and supper cost each 10 cents less or

Bacon, which cost $1.25 per pound in 1860, sold for $10, while the price of sugar increased more than fifteen-fold and coffee cost forty times what it had previously... No salt meant no meat during the long months following traditional slaughtering periods (late fall).Rapidly escalating prices encouraged hoarding and speculation, which drove prices up even more. Bartering transactions are excluded from historic pricing data sets because there were no records published in the newspaper, captured by commercial markets, or reported by the government.Food units are generally for large quantities, not comparable to modern supermarket prices. [SOURCE: Prices in Colonial Pennyslvania, Anne Bezanson, et al, University of Pennsylvania Press, 1935.] [1786-1817] Median annual prices for 14 leading commodities, Western Prices Before 1861/Thomas Senior Berry [Harvard University Press: Boston] 1943 [NOTE: This book offers dozens of price charts, including seasonal variations of Cincinnati Wholesale Commodity Prices 1824-1860 (p. [1832] Meat prices, Boston MA [1849] Retail food costs, California gold miners [1861-1865] American Civil War food prices [1860-2009] The Value of A Dollar: Prices and Incomes in the United States, selected food prices extracted from advertisements and federal data [NOTE: Value of a Dollar books are available in most public libraries. Urban taverns offered a wider range of services, including both public and private dining facilties. Pricing notes here: "The fare in a rural tavern..simple, whatever the tavern keeper had on hand for his/her own family and was willing to share...[18th century] Early American Tavern menu prices [1720-1775] Average wholesale prices of selected commodities in Philadelphia (bread, ship's bread, corn, rice, pork, flour, beef, salt, sugar, molasses, wine, & rum. 568-567).] [19th century] American pioneer provision prices [1817-1930] Family food expenditures [1817, 1833, 1851, 1864, 1926, 1930], The American and His Food/ Richard Osborn Cummings. In the back of this book you will find charts for selected items listing both historic prices and prices expressed in 2007 dollars.] [1874-1970] How much did Americans spend on food? These establishments offered meals to the general public. The prices charged for food (and nearly everything else) in a licensed tavern were regulated by law.Rice for Fraunces Tavern Museum [Regnery Gateway: Chicago] 1983 (p.85-93) Sample New Jersey prices: [1772: Mercer Country] "Princeton, 30th September 1772, 60 Dinners @2 s(hillings) each" ---"History of the Nassau Inn at Princeton," Prof. Lansing Collins, Proceedings of the New Jersey Historical Society, New Series, January 1930, Volume XV, No. 52) [1784: Burlington County NJ] Breakfast, 1 shilling; breakfast extraordinary, 1 shilling 3 pence; Dinner, 1 shilling 3 pence; Dinner extraordinary, 2 shillings; Supper, 1 shilling; Supper extraordinary, 2 shillings." ---Old Inns and Taverns in West Jersey, Camden County Historical Society, 1962) [1801: Middlesex County] In May, 1801 [Vernon Tavern, New Brunswick NJ] prices were fixed by Council were for a good breakfast 40 cents, a good dinner 50 cents, a good supper 40 cents, lodging 12 cents, making $1.42 per day; while a common breakfast, dinner, and supper cost each 10 cents less or $1.12 per day, for the less particular customers.it would be interesting to know just in what the bill of fare differed.'" ---"Early Taverns in New Brunswick," Wm. Benedict, Proceedings of the New Jersey Historical Society, New Series 1918, Volume III, No. 137) [1806: Salem County] Best dinner with pint of good beer or cider 37.5 cents Best breakfast, of tea, coffee or chocolate, loaf sugar 31 cents Ditto of cold meat with a pint of good beer or cider 25cents ---Old Inns and Taverns in West Jersey Alternative payment plans? "In the course of examining the [Elizabethtown NJ] tavern ledger we find some unusual mediums of exchange accepted in lieu of money.

||

Bacon, which cost $1.25 per pound in 1860, sold for $10, while the price of sugar increased more than fifteen-fold and coffee cost forty times what it had previously... No salt meant no meat during the long months following traditional slaughtering periods (late fall).

Rapidly escalating prices encouraged hoarding and speculation, which drove prices up even more. Bartering transactions are excluded from historic pricing data sets because there were no records published in the newspaper, captured by commercial markets, or reported by the government.

Food units are generally for large quantities, not comparable to modern supermarket prices. [SOURCE: Prices in Colonial Pennyslvania, Anne Bezanson, et al, University of Pennsylvania Press, 1935.] [1786-1817] Median annual prices for 14 leading commodities, Western Prices Before 1861/Thomas Senior Berry [Harvard University Press: Boston] 1943 [NOTE: This book offers dozens of price charts, including seasonal variations of Cincinnati Wholesale Commodity Prices 1824-1860 (p. [1832] Meat prices, Boston MA [1849] Retail food costs, California gold miners [1861-1865] American Civil War food prices [1860-2009] The Value of A Dollar: Prices and Incomes in the United States, selected food prices extracted from advertisements and federal data [NOTE: Value of a Dollar books are available in most public libraries. Urban taverns offered a wider range of services, including both public and private dining facilties. Pricing notes here: "The fare in a rural tavern..simple, whatever the tavern keeper had on hand for his/her own family and was willing to share...

[18th century] Early American Tavern menu prices [1720-1775] Average wholesale prices of selected commodities in Philadelphia (bread, ship's bread, corn, rice, pork, flour, beef, salt, sugar, molasses, wine, & rum. 568-567).] [19th century] American pioneer provision prices [1817-1930] Family food expenditures [1817, 1833, 1851, 1864, 1926, 1930], The American and His Food/ Richard Osborn Cummings. In the back of this book you will find charts for selected items listing both historic prices and prices expressed in 2007 dollars.] [1874-1970] How much did Americans spend on food? These establishments offered meals to the general public. The prices charged for food (and nearly everything else) in a licensed tavern were regulated by law.

.12 per day, for the less particular customers.it would be interesting to know just in what the bill of fare differed.'" ---"Early Taverns in New Brunswick," Wm. Benedict, Proceedings of the New Jersey Historical Society, New Series 1918, Volume III, No. 137) [1806: Salem County] Best dinner with pint of good beer or cider 37.5 cents Best breakfast, of tea, coffee or chocolate, loaf sugar 31 cents Ditto of cold meat with a pint of good beer or cider 25cents ---Old Inns and Taverns in West Jersey Alternative payment plans? "In the course of examining the [Elizabethtown NJ] tavern ledger we find some unusual mediums of exchange accepted in lieu of money.

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Breakfast, dinner, and supper were the same price, one shilling and six pence...

War ration book, New Jersey Price and Supply on the Home Front, Harriet Elliott, Consumer Division, Office of Price Administration and Civilian Supply, Survey Graphic, July, 1941.



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